Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Sci Med Sport. 2006 Dec;9(6):472-8. Epub 2006 Jun 12.

Athletic identity and its relationship to sport participation levels.

Author information

1
Centre for Rural and Remote Area Health, Faculty of Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, PO Darling Heights, QLD, Australia. lamontm@usq.edu.au

Abstract

This study looked at the relationship between athletic identity and three levels of sport participation (elite, recreational, non-participation). Athletic identity was measured using the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS) with participants being compared on the total AIMS score and scores on its three factors (social identity, exclusivity, negative affectivity). Results indicated that the male non-participation group scored lower on all three factors and the total AIMS when compared to the two athlete groups. The male elite and recreational groups did not differ on exclusivity and negative affectivity but did differ on the total AIMS and social identity, with elite scoring higher than recreational. For female participants, the non-participation group again scored lower on all three factors and the total AIMS when compared to the two athlete groups. The female elite and recreational groups did not differ on negative affectivity but did differ on the total AIMS, social identity, and exclusivity, with elite scoring higher than recreational. Findings suggest that to assume sport is only important to elite athletes ignores the role that sport may play for less talented sport participants. Whilst not seeing themselves as athletes per se, it is suggested that participation in sport may still impact upon the self-perceptions of recreational sport participants. Therefore, threats to participation may result in similar negative consequences for both elite athletes and recreational sport participants.

PMID:
16765643
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2006.04.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center