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Neurocrit Care. 2006;4(3):223-8.

Clipping or coiling of ruptured cerebral aneurysms and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. varelas@neuro.hfh.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hydrocephalus may develop either early in the course of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or after the first 2 weeks. Because the amount of SAH is a predictor of hydrocephalus, the two available aneurysmal treatments, clipping or coiling, may lead to differences in the need for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion, as only surgery permits clot removal.

METHODS:

Hospital and University Hospitals Consortium (UHC) databases were used to retrieve data on all patients admitted to our hospital with aneurysmal SAH during the last 4 years. The incidence of permanent ventricular shunt (VS) according to treatment modality used was evaluated.

RESULTS:

One hundred eighty-eight patients were admitted with aneurysmal SAH. Coiling was performed on 48 (26%) and clipping on 135 (73.8%) patients. Fifty-six (31%) patients required CSF diversion. External ventricular drain was placed in 30 (22.2%) clipped and 13 (27.1%) coiled patients ( p = 0.5 ), and VS in 6 patients of the two treatment groups (4.4 versus 12.5%, respectively; p = 0.08). Patients requiring VS had longer UHC-expected hospital length of stay (LOS), as well as observed ICU and hospital LOS, compared to patients with temporary or no CSF diversion (24 +/- 14 versus 15 +/- 8, 20.5 +/- 9 versus 11 +/- 7, and 30 +/- 13 versus 16 +/- 11 days, respectively; p <or= 0.01). In a logistic regression model, VS was independently associated with rebleeding, external ventricular drain placement, coiling, and UHC-expected LOS (odds ratios, 95% confidence interval 12.1, 2.3 - 62.6, 6.9, 1.6 - 30, 6.25, 1.3 - 29, and 1.1, 1.02 - 1.14, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

One-third of patients admitted with aneurysmal SAH require temporary or permanent CSF diversion. Permanent shunting was found to be associated with coiling in our patient population.

PMID:
16757827
DOI:
10.1385/NCC:4:3:223
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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