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J Biol Chem. 2006 Aug 11;281(32):22847-54. Epub 2006 Jun 6.

Metabolic inactivation of resolvin E1 and stabilization of its anti-inflammatory actions.

Author information

1
Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

The resolvins (Rv) are lipid mediators derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that act within a local inflammatory milieu to stop leukocyte recruitment and promote resolution. Resolvin E1 (RvE1; (5S,12R,18R)-trihydroxy-6Z,8E,10E,14Z,16E-eicosapentaenoic acid) is an oxygenase product derived from omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid that displays potent anti-inflammation/pro-resolution actions in vivo. Here, we determined whether oxidoreductase enzymes catalyze the conversion of RvE1 and assessed the biological activity of the RvE1 metabolite. With NAD+ as a cofactor, recombinant 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase acted as an 18-hydroxyl dehydrogenase to form 18-oxo-RvE1. In the murine lung, dehydrogenation of the hydroxyl group at carbon 18 position to form 18-oxo-RvE1 represented the major initial metabolic route for RvE1. At a concentration where RvE1 potently reduced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment in zymosan-induced peritonitis, 18-oxo-RvE1 was devoid of activity. In human neutrophils, carbon 20 hydroxylation of RvE1 was the main route of conversion. An RvE1 analog, i.e. 19-(p-fluorophenoxy)-RvE1, was synthesized that resisted rapid metabolic inactivation and proved to retain biological activity reducing PMN infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production in vivo. These results established the structure of a novel RvE1 initial metabolite, indicating that conversion of RvE1 to the oxo product represents a mode of RvE1 inactivation. Moreover, the designed RvE1 analog, which resisted further metabolism/inactivation, could be a useful tool to evaluate the actions of RvE1 in complex disease models.

PMID:
16757471
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M603766200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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