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Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(5):561-6.

Predictions for the decision-to-delivery interval for emergency cesarean sections in Norway.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway. toril.kolas@sykehuset-innlandet.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To explain the variation in decision-to-delivery intervals in emergency cesarean sections in Norway.

METHODS:

A seven-month prospective registration of all emergency cesareans provided by 24 maternity units. The clinician in charge filled in a predesigned form for each delivery that obtained detailed information about obstetric history, the pregnancy, indication, the date and time of delivery, decision-to-delivery interval, seniority of the surgeon, and neonatal outcome until hospital discharge. To take account of the clustered nature of our observations, data were analyzed by multilevel regression.

RESULTS:

1,511 singleton emergency cesarean sections with known decision-to-delivery interval were included. The average decision-to-delivery interval for all emergency cesarean sections was 52.4 min, for acute cesarean sections 58.7 min, and for urgent emergency operations 11.8 min. Most of the decision-to-delivery interval variation was at patient level, not between departments. Several significant decision-to-delivery interval predictors were identified: 1. abruptio placentae (-54 min), umbilical cord prolapse (-37 min), and fetal stress (-35 min); 2. general anesthesia (versus regional) (-15 min), 3. cesarean sections performed during night-time (-10 min), 4. seniority of the surgeon (-6 min), and 5. cervical opening (for each cm: -6 min).

CONCLUSIONS:

The variance in the decision-to-delivery interval was mainly explained by the different nature of the cesarean sections. The most important predictors, which all acted to reduce decision-to-delivery interval, were the three indications abruptio placentae, cord prolapse, and fetal stress. Sections performed during night-time had significantly reduced decision-to-delivery interval. The size of the maternal units as measured by number of deliveries per year was not a significant predictor.

PMID:
16752234
DOI:
10.1080/00016340600589487
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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