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Clin Chem. 2006 Aug;52(8):1539-45. Epub 2006 Jun 1.

Opioid disposition in human sweat after controlled oral codeine administration.

Author information

1
Chemistry and Drug Metabolism, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Characterization of opioid excretion in sweat is important for accurate interpretation of sweat tests in drug treatment, criminal justice, and workplace drug testing programs.

METHODS:

Participants (n=20) received placebo, 3 low (60 mg/70 kg) or 3 high (120 mg/70 kg) codeine sulfate doses (used as a model for opioid excretion) within 1 week. Codeine and metabolites in sweat were collected with PharmChek Sweat Patches; hourly patches were applied for 1 to 15 h (n=775) and weekly patches for 7 days (n=118). Patches were analyzed by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for codeine, norcodeine, morphine, normorphine, and 6-acetylmorphine. Limits of quantification were 2.5 ng/patch (codeine and morphine) and 5 ng/patch (other analytes).

RESULTS:

Codeine was the only analyte identified in 12.6% of hourly patches and 83.3% of weekly sweat patches worn during dosing. Weekly patch concentrations (SD) were 38.6 (59.9) ng/patch [median (range), 15.9 (0-225.1) ng/patch] for low and 34.1 (32.7) ng/patch [24.0 (0-96.2) ng/patch] for high codeine doses. Codeine detected 1 week after dosing was 4.6 (5.3) ng/patch [median (range), 4.0 (0-17.1) ng/patch; n=11] after low and 7.7 (7.1) ng/patch [6.9 (0-20.5) ng/patch; n=10] after high doses. In total, 2.6% of hourly, 38.5% of low-dose, and 45.5% of high-dose weekly patches contained codeine at the proposed Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration cutoff.

CONCLUSIONS:

Codeine was the only analyte detected, at highly variable concentrations, up to 2 weeks after dosing. These results are consistent, considering the complex processes of codeine deposition in sweat. Sweat testing is a useful alternative technique for qualitative monitoring of opioid use.

PMID:
16740647
DOI:
10.1373/clinchem.2006.067983
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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