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J Physiol. 2006 Aug 1;574(Pt 3):635-42. Epub 2006 May 18.

Residual force enhancement in skeletal muscle.

Author information

1
University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4. walter@kin.ucalgary.ca

Abstract

Residual force enhancement has been observed consistently in skeletal muscles following active stretching. However, its underlying mechanism(s) remain elusive, and it cannot be explained readily within the framework of the cross-bridge theory. Traditionally, residual force enhancement has been attributed to the development of sarcomere length non-uniformities. However, recent evidence suggests that this might not be the case. Rather, it appears that residual force enhancement has an active and a passive component. The active component is tentatively associated with changes in the cross-bridge kinetics that might be reflected in decreased detachment rates following active muscle stretching, while the passive component possibly originates from a structural protein, such as titin, whose stiffness might be regulated by calcium.

PMID:
16709641
PMCID:
PMC1817744
DOI:
10.1113/jphysiol.2006.107748
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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