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Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Mar;12(3):452-9.

Self-medication with antimicrobial drugs in Europe.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands. l.grigoryan@med.umcg.nl

Abstract

We surveyed the populations of 19 European countries to compare the prevalence of antimicrobial drug self-medication in the previous 12 months and intended self-medication and storage and to identify the associated demographic characteristics. By using a multistage sampling design, 1,000-3,000 adults in each country were randomly selected. The prevalence of actual self-medication varied from 1 to 210 per 1,000 and intended self-medication from 73 to 449 per 1,000; both rates were high in eastern and southern Europe and low in northern and western Europe. The most common reasons for self-medication were throat symptoms (e.g., dry, inflamed, red, or sore throat, inflamed tonsils, tonsil pain). The main medication sources were pharmacies and medication leftover from previous prescriptions. Younger age, higher education, and presence of a chronic disease were associated with higher rates of self-medication. Attempts to reduce inappropriate self-medication should target prescribers, pharmacists, and the general public.

PMID:
16704784
PMCID:
PMC3291450
DOI:
10.3201/eid1203.050992
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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