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Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Jul;4(7):902-7; quiz 806. Epub 2006 May 11.

Incidence of statin hepatotoxicity in patients with hepatitis C.

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1
Pharmacy Service, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Statins are considered contraindicated in patients with chronic liver disease. Our objective was to determine the risk of developing hepatotoxicity from statin therapy in hyperlipidemic patients with hepatitis C.

METHODS:

Changes in liver biochemistry values within 12 months compared with baseline were determined in 3 cohorts matched for age, sex, and body mass index: (I) 166 anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive hyperlipidemic veterans who were initiated on statin therapy; (II) 332 anti-HCV-positive veterans who had not received statin therapy; and (III) 332 anti-HCV-negative hyperlipidemic veterans who were initiated on statin therapy. An increase in liver biochemistry values was defined as mild-moderate or severe as proposed in a previous study on statin hepatotoxicity in a non-hepatitis C population.

RESULTS:

In patients with hepatitis C, statin therapy (cohort I) was associated with a higher incidence of mild-moderate liver biochemistry value increases compared with those not on statin therapy (cohort II) (22.9% vs 13.3%, respectively, P = .009), but a lower incidence of severe increases (1.2% vs 6.6%, respectively, P = .015). Among patients started on statin therapy (cohorts I and III), the incidence of mild-moderate liver biochemistry value increases (22.9% vs 16.3%, respectively, P = .094), severe increases (1.2% vs 1%, respectively, P = .874), or discontinuation of statin therapy as a result of hepatotoxicity (21.6% vs 9.2%, respectively, P = .147) were similar in hepatitis C-positive and hepatitis C-negative patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Statin therapy was not associated with a higher risk of severe hepatotoxicity in patients with chronic hepatitis C and appeared safe.

PMID:
16697272
DOI:
10.1016/j.cgh.2006.03.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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