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World J Gastroenterol. 2006 Apr 21;12(15):2459-63.

Early removing gastrointestinal decompression and early oral feeding improve patients' rehabilitation after colorectostomy.

Author information

1
Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, China. zhoutong0088@163.com

Abstract

AIM:

To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and tolerance of early removing gastrointestinal decompression and early oral feeding in the patients undergoing surgery for colorectal carcinoma.

METHODS:

Three hundred and sixteen patients submitted to operations associated with colorectostomy from January 2004 to September 2005 were randomized to two groups: In experimental group (n=161), the nasogastric tube was removed after the operation from 12 to 24 h and was promised immediately oral feeding; In control group (n=155), the nasogastric tube was maintained until the passage of flatus per rectum. Variables assessed included the time to first passage of flatus, the time to first passage of stool, the time elapsed postoperative stay, and postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage, acute dilation of stomach, wound infection and dehiscense, fever, pulmonary infection and pharyngolaryngitis.

RESULTS:

The median and average days to the first passage of flatus (3.0+/-0.9 vs 3.6+/-1.2, P<0.001), the first passage of stool (4.1+/-1.1 vs 4.8+/-1.4, P<0.001) and the length of postoperative stay (8.4+/-3.4 vs 9.6+/-5.0, P<0.05) were shorter in the experimental group than in the control group. The postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage (1.24% vs 2.58%), acute dilation of stomach (1.86% vs 0.06%) and wound complications (2.48% vs 1.94%) were similar in the groups, but fever (3.73% vs 9.68%, P<0.05), pulmonary infection (0.62% vs 4.52%, P<0.05) and pharyngolaryngitis (3.11% vs 23.23%, P<0.001) were much more in the control group than in the experimental group.

CONCLUSION:

The present study shows that application of gastrointestinal decompression after colorectostomy can not effectively reduce postoperative complications. On the contrary, it may increase the incidence rate of fever, pharyngolaryngitis and pulmonary infection. These strategies of early removing gastrointestinal decompression and early oral feeding in the patients undergoing colorectostomy are feasible and safe and associated with reduced postoperative discomfort and can accelerate the return of bowel function and improve rehabilitation.

PMID:
16688845
PMCID:
PMC4088090
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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