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Br J Sports Med. 2006 Jul;40(7):610-3; discussion 613. Epub 2006 May 10.

Single leg balance test to identify risk of ankle sprains.

Author information

1
University of Connecticut Health Center/Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Family Medicine, Hartford, Connecticut 06105, USA. ttrojian@stfranciscare.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ankle sprains are a common and potentially disabling injury. Successful prediction of susceptibility to ankle sprain injury with a simple test could allow ankle sprain prevention protocols to be initiated and help prevent disability in the athletic population.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the ability of the single leg balance (SLB) test, carried out at preseason physical examination, to predict an ankle sprain during the autumn sports season.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study

SETTING:

High school varsity athletics and intercollegiate athletics.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Ankle sprains in athletes with positive SLB tests.

RESULTS:

The association between a positive SLB test and future ankle sprains was significant. Controlling for confounding variables, the relative risk for an ankle sprain with a positive SLB test was 2.54 (95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 6.03). Athletes with a positive SLB test who did not tape their ankles had an increased likelihood of developing ankle sprains. The relative risk for ankle sprain for a positive SLB test and negative taping was 8.82 (1.07 to 72.70). A history of previous ankle injury was not associated with future ankle sprains in this study. The kappa value for interrater reliability for the SLB test was 0.898 (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

An association was demonstrated between a positive SLB test and ankle sprain. In athletes with a positive SLB test, not taping the ankle imposed an increased risk of sprain. The SLB test is a reliable and valid test for predicting ankle sprains.

PMID:
16687483
PMCID:
PMC2564306
DOI:
10.1136/bjsm.2005.024356
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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