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Rev Port Cardiol. 2006 Feb;25(2):155-71.

Metabolic score--a simple risk marker in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes.

[Article in English, Portuguese]

Author information

1
Serviço de Cardiologia, Hospital de Santa Cruz, Carnaxide, Portugal. lforl@clix.pt

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Atherothrombotic coronary artery disease is increasingly recognized as part of a systemic metabolic disorder. However, little is known about the significance of metabolic dysfunction in the setting of acute coronary syndrome.

OBJECTIVE:

Our aim was to assess the prognostic implications of markers of metabolic dysfunction at hospital admission obesity (BMI > 30), previous history of hypertension, admission glucose > 128 mg/dl, triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, and HDL cholesterol < 40 mg/dl for men, or < 50 mg for women--in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (ACS).

METHODS:

A total of 303 consecutive patients admitted to the CCU with ACS were included in the study. Mean age was 63 +/- 10 years, and 86% were male. The primary end-point was a composite of death or non-fatal acute myocardial infarction (MI) at one-year follow-up. Each marker was assigned one point, and a metabolic score (MetScore) was calculated for each individual patient by adding together the number of markers present at hospital admission. Three groups were considered: group 1 (MetScore 0) with 0 markers (n = 30); group 2 (MetScore 1 to 3) with 1 to 3 markers (n = 222); and group 3 (MetScore 4 to 5) with 4 to 5 markers (n = 51).

RESULTS:

The cumulative incidence of death or MI was 14.5%. We found a statistically significant relation between MetScore and outcome at one-year follow-up. The event rate was 3.3% in the MetScore 0 group, 13.9% in the MetScore 1 to 3 group and 23.5% in the MetScore 4 to 5 group (p = 0.0114). MetScore was an independent predictor of death or MI at one year, with a 2.3-fold risk increase (95% CI: 1.32-4.01; p = 0.003) from one group to the next. Other variables identified as independent predictors of outcome were advanced age, Killip class, ST-segment depression and previous CABG. The incidence of the primary end-point in diabetic patients without significant metabolic dysfunction and non-diabetic patients with SMD was similar (21.2% vs. 22.7%; p = NS).

CONCLUSION:

Assessment of markers of metabolic dysfunction on admission in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes, adds important prognostic information to conventional clinical, ECG and risk stratification markers and could prove useful in establishing secondary prevention strategies.

PMID:
16673646
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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