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Diabetes Care. 2006 May;29(5):998-1001.

Blood glucose and coronary artery disease in nondiabetic patients.

Author information

1
University of Nevada Reno School of Medicine, Reno, Nevada, USA. cnielson@med.unr.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Nondiabetic patients were studied to determine whether modest elevations in blood glucose may be associated with a greater incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD).

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Baseline morning blood glucose determinations were evaluated with respect to subsequent coronary disease using records from 24,160 nondiabetic patients. CAD was identified from myocardial infarction, new diagnoses of angina, or new prescriptions for nitroglycerin that occurred more than a year after baseline glucose determinations.

RESULTS:

Of 24,160 patients studied, 3,282 patients developed CAD over a total analysis time at risk of 77,048 years. Higher baseline morning glucose (100-126 vs. <100 mg/dl) was associated with a 53.9% greater myocardial infarction incidence rate, an 18.6% greater acute coronary syndrome incidence rate, and a 26.4% greater number of new prescriptions for nitrates (all P < 0.05). A Cox proportional hazards model with adjustment for age, BMI, sex, creatinine, lipids, smoking, and medications showed that elevated fasting glucose was associated with an increased hazard for new CAD (hazard ratio 1.13 [95% CI 1.05-1.21], glucose >100 vs. <100 mg/dl). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that elevated baseline glucose was associated with a progressive increase risk of CAD with time.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with higher baseline blood glucose levels in the absence of diabetes and after adjustment for covariants have a significantly greater risk for development of CAD.

PMID:
16644627
DOI:
10.2337/diacare.295998
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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