Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Health Commun. 2006;11 Suppl 1:103-15.

Lack of acknowledgment of fruit and vegetable recommendations among nonadherent individuals: associations with information processing and cancer cognitions.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. jlc57@pitt.edu

Abstract

Inadequate consumption of fruits and vegetables is regarded as an important behavioral risk factor for multiple types of cancer. Nevertheless, adherence with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) guidelines to eat between five and nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day is remarkably low. The current study explored the extent to which nonadherent respondents in a national survey (N = 5,625) listed fruit and vegetable consumption as a method by which to decrease their own or others' cancer risk. We sought to determine whether respondents who listed fruit and vegetable consumption as a method by which to decrease their own or others' cancer risk (hereafter referred to as "listers") differed from respondents who did not list fruit and vegetable consumption as a method by which to decrease their own or others' cancer risk (hereafter referred to as) "nonlisters" on measures of information processing and cancer cognitions. Nonlisters were more likely than listers to seek out cancer information but less likely to trust the information. The two groups did not differ in the amount of attention they paid to such information. Listers had lower absolute risk perceptions than nonlisters, but listers and nonlisters did not differ on measures of relative breast and colon cancer risk perceptions and worry for cancer in general. Female listers did perceive themselves to be at less relative risk for breast cancer than nonlisters. Respondents were more likely to list fruit and vegetable consumption as a cancer-risk reduction strategy for others than for themselves, suggesting a "double standard" in their beliefs. These findings suggest that communications designed to promote fruit and vegetable consumption need to account for biases in how nonadherent individuals respond to these communications.

PMID:
16641077
DOI:
10.1080/10810730600637491
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center