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J Ethn Subst Abuse. 2006;5(2):75-90.

Effects of acculturation and social norms on adolescent smoking among Asian-American subgroups.

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1
Division of Kinesiology and Health Science, California State University, 800 N State College Blvd, Fullerton, CA 92834, USA. jweiss@.fullerton.edu

Abstract

This study provides new information about how acculturation and perceived social norms affect adolescents smoking among four Asian-American subgroups. Results showed differences in smoking prevalence rates across subgroups, with Koreans having the highest rates of smoking, while Chinese have the lowest rates. In contrast to the large gender disparity in the ancestral countries, smoking rates were equal for Asian-American boys and girls. Acculturation was significantly associated with an increased risk for lifetime smoking for Asian-American girls, but not for boys. Perceived social norms regarding peer smoking were significantly associated with smoking behaviors for both genders and for all subgroups.

PMID:
16635975
DOI:
10.1300/J233v05n02_05
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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