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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2006 May;87(5):697-702.

Test-retest reliability of isokinetic dynamometry for the assessment of spasticity of the knee flexors and knee extensors in children with cerebral palsy.

Author information

1
Research Department, Shriners Hospitals for Children in Philadelphia 19140, and Institute for Physical Therapy Education, Widener University, Chester, PA, USA. srpierce@mail.widener.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess test-retest reliability of the peak resistance torque and slope of work methods of spasticity measurement of the knee flexors and extensors in children with cerebral palsy (CP).

DESIGN:

Test-retest reliability study.

SETTING:

Pediatric orthopedic hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fifteen children with CP.

INTERVENTION:

Knee extensor and flexor spasticity was assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer using passive movements at 15 degrees, 90 degrees, and 180 degrees/s taken 1 hour apart.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Peak resistive torque and work were calculated. The relative and absolute test-retest reliability was calculated by using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots, respectively.

RESULTS:

Relative reliability was good (ICC>.75) for slope-of-work and peak resistance torque measurements at a velocity of 180 degrees/s, whereas reliability of peak torque measurements was decreased (ICC<.51) at slower velocities for both muscle groups. The 95% limits of agreement of Bland-Altman plots contained most data points for both methods, but the width of the limits of agreement were wide.

CONCLUSIONS:

The measurement of spasticity of the knee extensors and flexors in children with CP using peak-resistance torque at 180 degrees/s and the slope of work method has acceptable relative test-retest reliability. However, the absolute reliability of spasticity data should be considered cautiously.

PMID:
16635633
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2006.01.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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