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Exp Physiol. 2006 Jul;91(4):693-703. Epub 2006 Apr 20.

Effect of short-term starvation versus high-fat diet on intramyocellular triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance in physically fit men.

Author information

1
The School of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe 1825, Australia. n.johnson@fhs.usyd.edu.au

Abstract

It is currently believed that intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) accumulation and insulin resistance are a consequence of dietary fat ingestion and/or the elevated circulating lipid levels associated with chronic fat surplus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of short-term starvation versus low-carbohydrate (CHO)/high-fat diet on IMTG accumulation and the development of insulin resistance in physically fit men. Intramyocellular triglyceride content, measured as intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and glucose tolerance/insulin sensitivity, assessed by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT), were determined after 67 h of: (a) water-only starvation (S); and (b) very low-CHO/high-fat diet (LC). These diets had in common significant restriction of CHO availability but large differences in fat content. All results were compared with those measured after a mixed CHO diet (C). Dietary interventions were administered by cross-over design. The level of dietary-induced IMTG accumulation (P = 0.46), insulin resistance (P = 0.27) and glucose intolerance (P = 0.29) was not different between S and LC treatments. Intramyocellular triglyceride content and insulin sensitivity were negatively correlated (r = -0.63, P < 0.01). Therefore, whilst insulin resistance may be due to fat accumulation at a cellular level, in the integrated human organism this outcome is not exclusively a function of dietary fat intake. The comparable level of IMTG accumulation and insulin resistance following S and LC may suggest that these metabolic perturbations are largely a consequence of the increased lipolytic response associated with CHO restriction.

PMID:
16627573
DOI:
10.1113/expphysiol.2006.033399
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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