Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2006 Apr;16(4):253-6.

Mass casualty management after a suicidal terrorist attack on a religious procession in Quetta, Pakistan.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, Combined Military Hospital, Quetta. Zakamalik2003@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effectiveness of hospital management, considering triage system, hospital staff response, medical resources availability, and surgical management depending upon the nature and pattern of injuries in a mass casualty incident.

DESIGN:

Descriptive.

PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY:

Combined Military Hospital, Quetta, Pakistan in March 2004.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

All injured by gunshot or blast in a terrorist attack and reported to the hospital were included in this study. Patients were triaged by the triage team using "triage sieve" into priority I, II, III, and IV. Priority I patients were further triaged by using "trauma index" to prioritize for surgery. Phase I included life saving, Phase II limb saving surgery and Phase III for debridement. All data was recorded and analyzed.

RESULTS:

Hospital received 161 casualties among whom 20 were brought in dead, and 141 patients were admitted to the hospital. Mean age was 26.63 +/- 13.97. The cases were categorized as Priority-I 22.7%, Priority-II 14.72%, Priority-III 50.31% and Priority-IV 12.27%. Maximum casualties reached within the first 2 hours. Eighty-eight patients had pre-dominantly splinter injuries and 53 patients had dominantly gunshot wound injuries. In priority I, the trauma index was 15.55 +/- 5.74. Six patients having trauma index 20 or above could not even be resuscitated. Seventy five percent of staff reported to the hospital within 15 minutes. Only 30% of reserve medical store was consumed. Total management cost to the hospital was Rs. 362,1856/- (British Pounds approx 32,052/-.) calculated by the hospital rates for treatment of non-entitled patients. Death rate in hospital survivors was 4%.

CONCLUSION:

Mass casualty management in a terrorist act requires prompt hospital response, appropriate triage, efficient surgical approach, and dedicated postoperative care. A good response can help to decrease mortality rate in salvageable injuries.

PMID:
16624186
DOI:
4.2006/JCPSP.253256
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center