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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2006 Oct;74(1):90-4. Epub 2006 Apr 18.

The influence of glucose self-monitoring on glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus in Sudan.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. moawia.abdelgadir@medsci.uu.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the influence of self-monitoring of glucose on the glycaemic control in Sudanese diabetic subjects.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A group of 193 consecutive type 2 and type 1 diabetic subjects (95 men, 98 women) were studied. In 104 subjects with type 2 diabetes fasting blood glucose was measured using a glucose meter and blood was obtained for serum glucose measurement in the laboratory. In the remaining 89 diabetic subjects random blood glucose was measured using the same glucose meter and a whole blood sample was drawn for laboratory assessment of HbA1c. Data on self-monitoring and other clinical and personal characteristics were recorded.

RESULTS:

More than 75% of either type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients never self-monitored blood or urine glucose. In type 2 diabetic subjects self-monitoring of blood or urine glucose was not related to glycaemic control. In type 1 diabetic subjects, however, self-monitoring of blood glucose was significantly associated with better glycaemic control, as assessed by HbA1c (P=0.02) and blood glucose at clinic visits (P< or =0.0001), and similar associations were found for urine glucose self-monitoring (P=0.04 and 0.02) respectively. Neither glycaemic control nor glucose self-monitoring was associated with education level.

CONCLUSIONS:

Self-monitoring of blood glucose was not found to be associated to better glycaemic control in Sudanese subjects with type 2 diabetes. In contrast, self-monitoring of both blood and urine glucose was significantly associated with glycaemic control in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Self-monitoring of urine glucose could be useful where measurement of blood glucose is not available or affordable.

PMID:
16621118
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2006.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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