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Gastroenterology. 2006 Apr;130(4):1135-43.

Hyponatremia impairs early posttransplantation outcome in patients with cirrhosis undergoing liver transplantation.

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1
Liver Unit, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Hyponatremia is associated with reduced survival in patients with cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation. However, it is not known whether hyponatremia also represents a risk factor of poor outcome after transplantation. We aimed to assess the effects of hyponatremia at the time of transplantation on posttransplantation outcome in patients with cirrhosis.

METHODS:

Two-hundred forty-one consecutive patients with cirrhosis submitted to liver transplantation during a 4-year period (January 2000-December 2003) were included in the study. The main end point was survival at 3 months after transplantation. Secondary end points were complications within the first month after transplantation.

RESULTS:

Patients with hyponatremia (serum sodium lower than 130 mEq/L) had a greater incidence of neurologic disorders, renal failure, and infectious complications than patients without hyponatremia (odds ratio; 4.6, 3.4 and 2.7, respectively) within the first month after transplantation. By contrast, hyponatremia was not associated with an increased incidence of severe intra-abdominal bleeding, acute rejection, or vascular and biliary complications. Hyponatremia was an independent predictive factor of early posttransplantation survival. Three-month survival of patients with hyponatremia was 84% compared with 95% of patients without hyponatremia (P < .05). Survival was similar after 3 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients with cirrhosis, the presence of hyponatremia is associated with a high rate of neurologic disorders, infectious complications, and renal failure during the first month after transplantation and reduced 3-month survival. In cirrhosis, hyponatremia should be considered not only a risk factor of death before transplantation but also a risk factor of impaired early posttransplantation outcome.

PMID:
16618408
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2006.02.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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