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J Exp Med. 2006 Apr 17;203(4):813-6. Epub 2006 Apr 10.

Lipoprotein oxidation in cardiovascular disease: chief culprit or innocent bystander?

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. heinecke@u.washington.edu

Abstract

Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to contribute to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Consistent with this idea, the antioxidant drug probucol reduces the risk of restenosis, a form of cardiovascular disease, in humans. However, a new study now suggests that the protective effect of probucol depends not on its ability to inhibit lipid oxidation, but on its ability to induce the stress-induced antiinflammatory enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. This might explain why other antioxidants, such as vitamin E, fail to prevent cardiovascular disease in humans.

PMID:
16606677
PMCID:
PMC2118281
DOI:
10.1084/jem.20060218
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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