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Clin J Sport Med. 2006 Mar;16(2):162-5.

Mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, McGill University Health Centre 2, and McGill Sport Medicine Clinic, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. j.delaney@mcgill.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer.

DESIGN:

Prospective analysis.

SETTING:

McGill University.

PATIENTS:

All athletes participating in varsity football, ice hockey, and soccer.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Athletes participating in university varsity football, ice hockey, and soccer were followed prospectively to determine the mechanisms of injury for concussions, whether certain mechanisms of injury causing concussions were more common in any of the three sports, whether different areas of the body seem to be more vulnerable to a concussion after contact, and whether these areas might be predisposed to higher grades of concussion after contact.

RESULTS:

There were 69 concussions in 60 athletes over a 3-year period. Being hit in the head or helmet was the most common mechanism of injury for all 3 sports. The side/temporal area of the head or helmet was the most probable area to be struck, resulting in concussion for both football and soccer. When examining the body part or object delivering the concussive blow, contact with another player's helmet was the most probable mechanism in football.

CONCLUSION:

The mechanisms of injury for concussions in football are similar to previously published research on professional football players. The mechanisms of injury for concussions in soccer are similar to past research on Australian rules football and rugby.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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