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Cancer Lett. 2007 Jan 8;245(1-2):1-10. Epub 2006 Apr 4.

Jasmonates in cancer therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Human Microbiology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, 69978, Tel Aviv Israel. flascher@post.tau.ac.il

Abstract

Several groups have reported in recent years that members of the plant stress hormones family of jasmonates, and some of their synthetic derivatives, exhibit anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. Jasmonates increased the life span of EL-4 lymphoma-bearing mice, and exhibited selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells while sparing normal blood lymphocytes, even when the latter were part of a mixed population of leukemic and normal cells drawn from the blood of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. Jasmonates join a growing number of old and new cancer chemotherapeutic compounds of plant origin. Three mechanisms of action have been proposed to explain the anti-cancer activity of jasmonates. These include: (1) The bio-energetic mechanism-jasmonates induce severe ATP depletion in cancer cells via mitochondrial perturbation; (2) The re-differentiation mechanism-jasmonates induce re-differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity; (3) The reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanism-jasmonates induce apoptosis in lung carcinoma cells via the generation of hydrogen peroxide, and pro-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family. Several similarities between the effects of jasmonates on plant and cancer cells have been recorded, suggesting that additional analysis of jasmonate effects in plant cells may contribute to a deeper understanding of the anti-cancer actions of these compounds. Those similarities include: induction of cell death, suppression of proliferation and cell cycle arrest, MAPK induction, ROS generation, and enhancement of heat-shock proteins (HSP) expression. Finally, jasmonates can induce death in drug-resistant cells. The drug resistance was conferred by either p53 mutation or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression. In summary, the jasmonate family of novel anti-cancer agents presents new hope for the development of cancer therapeutics, which should attract further scientific and pharmaceutical interest.

PMID:
16600475
DOI:
10.1016/j.canlet.2006.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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