Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2006 Apr;130(4):521-8.

Herbal remedies: effects on clinical laboratory tests.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Amitava.Dasgupta@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Complementary and alternative medicine (herbal medicines) can affect laboratory test results by several mechanisms.

OBJECTIVE:

In this review, published reports on effects of herbal remedies on abnormal laboratory test results are summarized and commented on.

DATA SOURCES:

All published reports between 1980 and 2005 with the key words herbal remedies or alternative medicine and clinical laboratory test, clinical chemistry test, or drug-herb interaction were searched through Medline. The authors' own publications were also included. Important results were then synthesized.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Falsely elevated or falsely lowered digoxin levels may be encountered in a patient taking digoxin and the Chinese medicine Chan Su or Dan Shen, owing to direct interference of a component of Chinese medicine with the antibody used in an immunoassay. St John's wort, a popular herbal antidepressant, increases clearance of many drugs, and abnormally low cyclosporine, digoxin, theophylline, or protease inhibitor concentrations may be observed in a patient taking any of these drugs in combination with St John's wort. Abnormal laboratory results may also be encountered owing to altered pathophysiology. Kava-kava, chaparral, and germander cause liver toxicity, and elevated alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and bilirubin concentrations may be observed in a healthy individual taking such herbal products. An herbal product may be contaminated with a Western drug, and an unexpected drug level (such as phenytoin in a patient who never took phenytoin but took a Chinese herb) may confuse the laboratory staff and the clinician.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of alternative medicines may significantly alter laboratory results, and communication among pathologists, clinical laboratory scientists, and physicians providing care to the patient is important in interpreting these results.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Allen Press, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Support Center