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BMC Public Health. 2006 Apr 3;6:85.

An epidemiological study on anemia among institutionalized people with intellectual and/or motor disability with special reference to its frequency, severity and predictors.

Author information

1
Department of Food Sciences, Ibaraki Christian University, 6-11-1 Ohmika Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1295, Japan. h.ohwada@icc.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To examine the type, frequency, severity, and predictors of anemia and its relationship with co-morbid conditions among institutionalized people with intellectual and/or motor disability.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study at a public facility for people with intellectual and/or motor disability in Ibaraki prefecture, Japan. Health checkup data obtained in 2001 from 477 people with intellectual disability (male: 286, average age 40.6 +/- 12.3; female: 191, average age 45.1 +/- 11.6) were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of anemia among male participants was higher than in female participants for each disability category (intellectual disability, 41.1%, 4.2%; cerebral palsy, 37.5%, 4.8%; Down's syndrome, 15.0%, 0%; severe motor and intellectual disabilities, 61.9%, 16.7%). Most participants with anemia (93.8 - 100%) showed a normocytic normochromic anemia pattern. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors related to an increase in frequency included sex (male), low body mass index (BMI), use of anticonvulsants or major tranquilizers, and a high zinc sulfate turbidity test (ZTT) value. No clinically diagnosed co-morbid condition was found to be related to the presence of anemia.

CONCLUSION:

A high frequency of mild normocytic normochromic anemia in institutionalized people with intellectual and/or motor disability was observed, particularly among males. Medications and chronic inflammation may increase the risk of anemia.

PMID:
16584554
PMCID:
PMC1525175
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-6-85
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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