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Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;188:305-12.

Psychotherapy plus antidepressant for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia: systematic review.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioural Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University Medical School, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601, Japan. furukawa@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Panic disorder can be treated with psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy or a combination of both.

AIMS:

To summarise the evidence concerning the short- and long-term benefits and adverse effects of a combination of psychotherapy and antidepressant treatment.

METHOD:

Meta-analyses and meta-regressions were undertaken using data from all relevant randomised controlled trials identified by a comprehensive literature search. The primary outcome was relative risk (RR) of response.

RESULTS:

We identified 23 randomised comparisons (21 trials involving a total of 1709 patients). In the acute-phase treatment, the combined therapy was superior to antidepressant pharmacotherapy (RR=1.24,95% CI1.02-1.52) or psychotherapy (RR=1.16,95% CI1.03-1.30). After termination of the acute-phase treatment, the combined therapy was more effective than pharmacotherapy alone (RR=1.61,95% CI1.23-2.11) and was as effective as psychotherapy (RR=0.96, 95% CI 0.79-1.16).

CONCLUSIONS:

Either combined therapy or psychotherapy alone may be chosen as first-line treatment for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, depending on the patient's preferences.

PMID:
16582055
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.188.4.305
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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