Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Res. 2006 Mar 15;66(6):3205-13.

Intrapulmonary administration of CCL21 gene-modified dendritic cells reduces tumor burden in spontaneous murine bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Lung Cancer Research Program, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095-1960, USA.

Abstract

The antitumor efficiency of dendritic cells transduced with an adenovirus vector expressing secondary lymphoid chemokine (CCL21) was evaluated in a murine model of spontaneous bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma. The transgenic mice (CC-10 TAg) express the SV40 large T antigen (TAg) under the Clara cell promoter, develop bilateral, multifocal, and pulmonary adenocarcinomas, and die at 4 months as a result of progressive pulmonary tumor burden. A single intratracheal administration of CCL21 gene-modified dendritic cells (DC-AdCCL21) led to a marked reduction in tumor burden with extensive mononuclear cell infiltration of the tumors. The reduction in tumor burden was accompanied by the enhanced elaboration of type 1 cytokines [IFN-gamma, interleukin (IL)-12, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor] and antiangiogenic chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10) but a concomitant decrease in the immunosuppressive molecules (IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta, prostaglandin E(2)) in the tumor microenvironment. The DC-AdCCL21 therapy group revealed a significantly greater frequency of tumor-specific T cells releasing IFN-gamma compared with the controls. Continuous therapy with weekly intranasal delivery of DC-AdCCL21 significantly prolonged median survival by >7 weeks in CC-10 TAg mice. Both innate natural killer and specific T-cell antitumor responses significantly increased following DC-AdCCL21 therapy. Significant reduction in tumor burden in a model in which tumors develop in an organ-specific manner provides a strong rationale for further evaluation of intrapulmonary-administered DC-AdCCL21 in regulation of tumor immunity and genetic immunotherapy for lung cancer.

PMID:
16540672
DOI:
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-05-3619
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center