Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Thorax. 2006 Jun;61(6):485-90. Epub 2006 Mar 14.

Validation of computed tomographic lung densitometry for monitoring emphysema in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

Author information

1
Lung Investigation Unit, First Floor, Nuffield House, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK, and Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lung densitometry derived from computed tomographic images offers an opportunity to quantify emphysema non-invasively, but a pathological standard cannot be applied to validate its use in longitudinal monitoring studies. Consequently, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) remains the standard against which new methods must be judged. We related progression of densitometry (15th percentile point and voxel index, threshold -950 Hounsfield units) to disease stage and FEV1 decline in two studies of subjects with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ).

METHODS:

Consistency of progression, measured using densitometry and FEV1, was assessed in relation to disease stage in a 2 year study of 74 subjects grouped according to the FEV1 criteria employed in the GOLD guidelines. In the second study of a subgroup of subjects with extended data (n=34), summary statistics were applied to measurements performed annually over 3 years and the rate of progression of densitometry was related to FEV1 decline.

RESULTS:

The progression of percentile point was consistent across a wide spectrum of disease severity, but voxel index progression varied in association with disease stage (p=0.004). In the second study, FEV1 decline correlated with progression of lung densitometry (percentile point: rS=0.527, p=0.001; voxel index: rS=-0.398, p=0.012).

CONCLUSIONS:

15th percentile point is a more consistent measure of lung density loss across a wide range of physiological impairment than voxel index. However, both methods are valid for use in longitudinal and interventional studies in which emphysema is the major outcome target.

PMID:
16537666
PMCID:
PMC2111224
DOI:
10.1136/thx.2005.054890
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center