Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Public Health. 2006 Apr;96(4):734-9. Epub 2006 Mar 14.

Obesity and risk for death due to motor vehicle crashes.

Author information

1
Injury Research Center and Dept of Family and Community Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. szhu@mcw.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the role of body mass index (BMI) and other factors in driver deaths within 30 days after motor vehicle crashes.

METHODS:

We collected data for 22 107 drivers aged 16 years and older who were involved in motor vehicle crashes from the Crashworthiness Data System of the National Automotive Sampling System (1997-2001). We used logistic regression and adjusted for confounding factors to analyze associations between BMI and driver fatality and the associations between BMI and gender, age, seatbelt use, type of collision, airbag deployment, and change in velocity during a crash.

RESULTS:

The fatality rate was 0.87% (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.50, 1.24) among men and 0.43% (95% CI=0.31, 0.56) among women involved as drivers in motor vehicle crashes. Risk for death increased significantly at both ends of the BMI continuum among men but not among women (P<.05). The association between BMI and male fatality increased significantly with a change in velocity and was modified by the type of collision, but it did not differ by age, seatbelt use, or airbag deployment.

CONCLUSIONS:

The increased risk for death due to motor vehicle crashes among obese men may have important implications for traffic safety and motor vehicle design.

PMID:
16537660
PMCID:
PMC1470534
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2004.058156
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center