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Neurosurgery. 2006 Mar;58(3):443-50; discussion 443-50.

Elective treatment of saccular and broad-necked intracranial aneurysms using a closed-cell nitinol stent (Leo).

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Duisburg-Essen, Rheinische Kliniken Essen, Research Unit, Essen, Germany. bernhard.kis@uni-duisburg-essen.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Endovascular coil embolization of saccular intracranial aneurysms is safe and effective, but long-term results are dissatisfying. Reconstructive treatments using stents improve occlusion rate and protect parent vessels. We present data on our experience with a new self-expanding stent manufactured with braided nitinol wires.

METHODS:

Twenty-five saccular, complex, and broad-necked intracranial aneurysms in 21 patients were treated electively. They were located at the internal carotid artery (10), basilar trunk (5), cavernous carotid artery (4), basilar tip (2), anterior cerebral artery (2), anterior communicating artery (1), and middle cerebral artery (1). Eleven aneurysms exhibited recanalization after primary endovascular treatment without stent.

RESULTS:

Stent deployment was successful in 24 lesions, and additional coil embolization was performed in 23. No permanent neurological deficits were encountered consequent to endovascular procedure. Complete or partial occlusion immediately after stent deployment was achieved in 19 aneurysms, whereas no immediate coil embolization was chosen in 6 cases. There were two thromboembolic events related to the deployment of the Leo stent, one failure of stent deployment, difficulties in stent positioning in three cases, and one asymptomatic parent artery occlusion after 7 months. Follow-up (available in 18 patients and 21 aneurysms and obtained at 3-12 mo; average, 5 mo) revealed patent stents in the remaining cases. Angiographic recurrences arose in three lesions, which were retreated without complications.

CONCLUSION:

Primary and recurrence treatment of saccular and broad-necked intracranial aneurysms using the Leo stent is feasible and effective. No permanent neurological deficits were associated with stent placement. Short-term follow-up identified intact parent arteries and stable occlusion rates in the majority of cases.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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