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J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2006 Winter;18(1):33-8.

The effect of major depression on subjective and objective cognitive deficits in mild to moderate traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
Sunnybrook and Women,s College Health Sciences Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Toronto, ON, M4N 3M5.

Abstract

The effect of major depression on subjective and objective cognitive deficits 6 months following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) was assessed in 63 subjects. Patients with subjective cognitive complaints (n=63) were more likely to be women, with higher Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores and have a diagnosis of major depression. They also performed significantly more poorly on various measures of memory, attention and executive functioning. Group differences on most but not all cognitive measures disappeared in a multivariate analysis when controlling for depression. In mild to moderate TBI, subjective cognitive deficits are linked in large measure to comorbid major depression. However, other mechanisms may also account for these deficits.

PMID:
16525068
DOI:
10.1176/jnp.18.1.33
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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