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Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Mar;57(3):373-81.

Subjective life satisfaction and living situations of persons in Finland with long-term schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku Psychiatric Clinic, Finland. raimo.k.r.salokangas@tyks.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study measured subjective life satisfaction among patients with long-term schizophrenia who were living in the community.

METHODS:

A representative national sample of 2,221 persons with schizophrenia who were discharged from psychiatric hospitals in Finland in 1986, 1990, and 1994 were interviewed three years after discharge. Subjective life satisfaction was measured; patients were asked about their current level of satisfaction and the level of satisfaction they recalled having at the time of discharge.

RESULTS:

Patients tended to report more satisfaction at follow-up if they were female, had good psychosocial functioning, had several confidants, or were living in group homes or dormitories. Patients tended to be less satisfied at follow-up if they were divorced or had mental and physical symptoms. Patients with depressive symptoms or with low psychosocial functioning and those who were currently hospitalized reported the smallest changes in levels of satisfaction between the two time points. Patients with low psychosocial functioning who were living with their parents, in group homes or dormitories, or in institutions were relatively satisfied, whereas patients with good psychosocial functioning were more satisfied if they lived with their spouse or partner.

CONCLUSIONS:

Being female and having good psychosocial functioning, confidants, good physical health, and living arrangements in the community that offer support corresponding to the patient's psychosocial state are important factors of life satisfaction among patients with long-term schizophrenia.

PMID:
16524996
DOI:
10.1176/appi.ps.57.3.373
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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