Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int Psychogeriatr. 2006 Dec;18(4):727-38. Epub 2006 Mar 9.

Gender differences in subtypes of late-onset depression and mania.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet and Department of Psychiatric Demography, University of Aarhus, Psychiatric Hospital, Risskov, Denmark. lars.kessing@rh.dk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is currently not known whether elderly men and women present with different subtypes of depression and mania/bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of subtypes of a single depressive episode and mania/bipolar disorder according to the ICD-10 for elderly men and women in a nationwide sample of all out- and inpatients in psychiatric settings.

METHODS:

All patients older than 65 years who received a diagnosis of a single depressive episode and mania/bipolar disorder in the period from 1994 to 2002 at the end of their first outpatient treatment or at their first discharge from psychiatric hospitalization in Denmark were identified in a nationwide register.

RESULTS:

A total of 9837 patients aged more than 65 years received a diagnosis of a single depressive episode (69.9% were women) and 443 a diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder (61.6% were women) at the end of their first contact with psychiatric health care. Slightly more women than men received a diagnosis of mild (70.8%) or moderate depression (67.4%) compared to severe depression (65.9%). Men more often presented with a single depressive episode with comorbid substance abuse or comorbid somatic illness. No gender differences were found in the prevalence of depression with or without melancholic or psychotic symptoms. Men more often presented with mania/bipolar disorder with comorbid substance abuse.

CONCLUSIONS:

The distributions of the subtypes of a single depressive episode or mania/bipolar disorder are remarkably similar for male and female patients aged over 65 years with first contact with the psychiatric health-care system.

PMID:
16524490
DOI:
10.1017/S104161020600319X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Cambridge University Press
    Loading ...
    Support Center