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Pediatrics. 2006 Mar;117(3):763-70.

A behavioral and cognitive profile of clinically stable HIV-infected children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, New York, USA. molly.nozyce@nbhn.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this research was to characterize behavioral and cognitive profiles of clinically and immunologically stable antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected children.

METHODS:

Two hundred seventy-four previously treated HIV-infected children aged 2 to 17 years were assessed for behavioral, developmental, and cognitive functioning. Correlations between neuropsychological measures, age, and CD4 lymphocyte count were investigated.

RESULTS:

The most common behavioral problems, as measured by the Conners' Parent Rating Scale, were psychosomatic (28%), learning (25%), hyperactivity (20%), impulsive-hyperactive (19%), conduct (16%), and anxiety (8%) problems. Mean Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III scores were less than established population norms; the mean verbal IQ was 85, the mean performance IQ was 90, and the mean full-scale score was 86. Hyperactivity was more frequent in children with a Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III performance IQ of <90. Anxiety problems were more likely in children > or =9 years of age. Children with CD4 counts of <660 cells per mm3 were more likely to be identified as having a conduct disorder. No association was noted between behavioral problems and neuroimaging.

CONCLUSIONS:

Clinically and immunologically stable HIV-infected children had more frequent behavioral problems and lower developmental and cognitive scores than established childhood norms.

PMID:
16510656
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2005-0451
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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