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J Neurosurg. 2006 Feb;104(2):272-7.

Long-term recovery after bone marrow stromal cell treatment of traumatic brain injury in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Health Sciences Center, Detroit, Michigan 48202, USA. nsaam@neuro.hfh.edu

Abstract

OBJECT:

This study was designed to follow the effects of bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) administration in rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for a 3-month period.

METHODS:

Forty adult female Wistar rats were injured by a controlled cortical impact and, 1 week later, were injected intravenously with one of three different doses of BMSCs (2 x 10(6), 4 x 10(6), or 8 x 10(6) cells per animal) obtained in male rats. Control rats received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Neurological function in these rats was studied using a neurological severity scale (NSS). The rats were killed 3 months after injury, and immunohistochemical stains were applied to brain samples to study the distribution of the BMSCs. Additional brain samples were analyzed by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to measure the expression of the growth factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). Three months after injury, BMSCs were present in the injured brain and their number was significantly greater in animals that received 4 x 10(6) or 8 x 10(6) BMSCs than in animals that received 2 x 10(6) BMSCs. The cells were primarily distributed around the lesion boundary zone. Functional outcome was significantly better in rats that received 4 x 10(6) or 8 x 10(6) BMSCs, compared with control animals, although no improvement was seen in animals that received 2 x 10(6) BMSCs. All doses of BMSCs significantly increased the expression of BDNF but not that of NGF; however, this increase was significantly larger in animals that received 4 x 10(6) or 8 x 10(6) BMSCs than in controls or animals that received 2 x 10(6) BMSCs.

CONCLUSIONS:

In summary, when injected in rats after TBI, BMSCs are present in the brain 3 months later and significantly improve functional outcome.

PMID:
16509501
DOI:
10.3171/jns.2006.104.2.272
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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