Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Gut. 2006 Aug;55(8):1131-7. Epub 2006 Feb 28.

Fontolizumab, a humanised anti-interferon gamma antibody, demonstrates safety and clinical activity in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease.

Author information

1
Department Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. d.w.hommes@amc.uva.nl

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Interferon gamma is a potent proinflammatory cytokine implicated in the inflammation of Crohn's disease (CD). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of fontolizumab, a humanised anti-interferon gamma antibody, in patients with moderate to severe CD.

METHODS:

A total of 133 patients with Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) scores between 250 and 450, inclusive, were randomised to receive placebo or fontolizumab 4 or 10 mg/kg. Forty two patients received one dose and 91 patients received two doses on days 0 and 28. Investigators and patients were unaware of assignment. Study end points were safety, clinical response (decrease in CDAI of 100 points or more), and remission (CDAI < or =150).

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant difference in the primary end point of the study (clinical response) between the fontolizumab and placebo groups after a single dose at day 28. However, patients receiving two doses of fontolizumab demonstrated doubling in response rate at day 56 compared with placebo: 32% (9/28) versus 69% (22/32, p = 0.02) and 67% (21/31, p = 0.03) for the placebo, and 4 and 10 mg/kg fontolizumab groups, respectively. Stratification according to elevated baseline C reactive protein levels resulted in a decreased placebo response and pronounced differences in clinical benefit. Two grade 3 adverse events were reported and were considered to be related to CD. One death (during sleep) and one serious adverse event (an elective hospitalisation) occurred, both considered unrelated.

CONCLUSION:

Treating active CD with fontolizumab was well tolerated and resulted in increased rates of clinical response and remission compared with placebo.

PMID:
16507585
PMCID:
PMC1856291
DOI:
10.1136/gut.2005.079392
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center