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Age Ageing. 2006 Mar;35(2):172-7.

Predictors of the quality of life of older people with heart failure recruited from primary care.

Author information

1
Sheffield Institute for Studies on Ageing, University of Sheffield, Elmfield, Northumberland Road, Sheffield S10 2TU, UK. m.gott@sheffield.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current understanding of quality of life in heart failure is largely derived from clinical trials. Older people, women and those with co-morbidities are underrepresented in these. Little is known about factors predictive of quality of life amongst older people with heart failure recruited from community settings.

OBJECTIVE:

To identify factors predictive of quality of life amongst older people recruited from community settings.

DESIGN:

prospective questionnaire survey.

SETTING:

General practice surgeries located in four areas of the UK: Bradford, Barnsley, East Devon and West Hampshire.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 542 people aged >60 years with heart failure.

METHODS:

Participants completed a postal questionnaire, which included a disease-specific measure (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire), a generic quality-of-life measure (SF-36) and sociodemographic information.

RESULTS:

A multiple linear regression analysis identified the following factors as predictive of decreased quality of life: being female, being in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III or IV, showing evidence of depression, being in socioeconomic groups III-V and experiencing two or more co-morbidities. Older age was associated with decreased quality of life, as measured by a generic health-related quality-of-life tool (the SF-36 mental and physical health functioning scales) but not by a disease-specific tool (the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire).

CONCLUSION:

Findings from the study suggest that quality of life for older people with heart failure can be described as challenging and difficult, particularly for women, those in a high NYHA class, patients showing evidence of depression, patients in socioeconomic groups III-V, those experiencing two or more co-morbidities and the 'oldest old'. Such information can help clinicians working with older people identify those at risk of reduced quality of life and target interventions appropriately.

PMID:
16495294
DOI:
10.1093/ageing/afj040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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