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J Cell Sci. 2006 Mar 15;119(Pt 6):1034-42. Epub 2006 Feb 21.

Mitotic accumulations of PML protein contribute to the re-establishment of PML nuclear bodies in G1.

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1
Programme in Cell Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada.

Abstract

Although the mechanism of chromosomal segregation is well known, it is unclear how other nuclear compartments such as promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies partition during mitosis and re-form in G1. We demonstrate that PML nuclear bodies partition via mitotic accumulations of PML protein (MAPPs), which are distinct from PML nuclear bodies in their dynamics, biochemistry and structure. During mitosis PML nuclear bodies lose biochemical components such as SUMO-1 and Sp100. We demonstrate that MAPPs are also devoid of Daxx and these biochemical changes occur prior to chromatin condensation and coincide with the loss of nuclear membrane integrity. MAPPs are highly mobile, yet do not readily exchange PML protein as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP). A subset of MAPPs remains associated with mitotic chromosomes, providing a possible nucleation site for PML nuclear body formation in G1. As the nuclear envelope reforms in late anaphase, these nascent PML nuclear bodies accumulate components sequentially, for example Sp100 and SUMO-1 before Daxx. After cytokinesis, MAPPs remain in the cytoplasm long after the reincorporation of splicing components and their disappearance coincides with new PML nuclear body formation even in the absence of new protein synthesis. The PML protein within MAPPs is not degraded during mitosis but is recycled to contribute to the formation of new PML nuclear bodies in daughter nuclei. The recycling of PML protein from one cell cycle to the next via mitotic accumulations may represent a common mechanism for the partitioning of other nuclear bodies during mitosis.

PMID:
16492707
DOI:
10.1242/jcs.02817
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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