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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006 Mar;16(2):148-55. Epub 2005 Dec 13.

High- or low-salt diet from weaning to adulthood: effect on body weight, food intake and energy balance in rats.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Division, Laboratory of Experimental Hypertension of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To get some additional insight on the mechanisms of the effect of salt intake on body weight.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Rats were fed a low (LSD), normal (NSD), or high (HSD) salt diet. In a first set, body weight, tail-cuff blood pressure, fasting plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone, triiodothyronine, L-thyroxine, glucose, insulin, and angiotensin II were measured. Angiotensin II content was determined in white and brown adipose tissues. Uncoupling protein 1 expression was measured in brown adipose tissue. In a second set, body weight, food intake, energy balance, and plasma leptin were determined. In a third set of rats, motor activity and body weight were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Blood pressure increased on HSD. Body weight was similar among groups at weaning, but during adulthood it was lower on HSD and higher on LSD. Food intake, L-thyroxine concentration, uncoupling protein 1 expression and energy expenditure were higher in HSD rats, while non-fasting leptin concentration was lower in these groups compared to NSD and LSD animals. Plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone decreased on both HSD and LSD while plasma glucose and insulin were elevated only on LSD. A decrease in plasma angiotensin II was observed in HSD rats. On LSD, an increase in brown adipose tissue angiotensin II content was associated to decreased uncoupling protein 1 expression and energy expenditure. In this group, a low angiotensin II content in white adipose tissue was also found. Motor activity was not influenced by the dietary salt content.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chronic alteration in salt intake is associated with changes in body weight, food intake, hormonal profile, and energy expenditure and tissue angiotensin II content.

Comment in

PMID:
16487915
DOI:
10.1016/j.numecd.2005.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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