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Int J Impot Res. 2006 Sep-Oct;18(5):464-9. Epub 2006 Feb 16.

The effect of vardenafil on endothelial function of brachial and cavernous arteries.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Russian State Medical University, Moscow, Russia. efax@rambler.ru

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of new phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor vardenafil on endothelial function of cavernous and brachial arteries in healthy men and in patients with different forms of erectile dysfunction (ED). This prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed on 135 men with ED and 30 healthy controls. Complex evaluation was performed in all patients with ED. All participants also underwent our modification of ultrasound (US) assessment of postocclusive changes in the diameter of cavernosal arteries and endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery before and 1 h after administration of 20 mg of vardenafil or placebo. After study drug administration, PICAD and FMD significantly increased in patients receiving vardenafil (P < 0.001) but not in patients receiving placebo. Increase in PICAD values was significantly greater in patients with arteriogenic ED compared with patients with organic nonarterial ED (P = 0.007), psychogenic ED (P < 0.001) and controls (P = 0.001). The most prominent increase in brachial artery FMD values were found in patients with arteriogenic ED, although statistically significant differences were present only between patients with arteriogenic ED and control group (P = 0.035). We have found a moderate negative correlation between initial PICAD and its increase after vardenafil and between pretreatment flow-mediated vasodilation of brachial arteries and its increase after vardenafil administration (r = -0.57 and -0.55, respectively). These findings suggest that the use of vardenafil restores impaired endothelial function of cavernous and brachial arteries.

PMID:
16482199
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijir.3901454
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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