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Immunology. 2006 Mar;117(3):310-8.

Vitamin D receptor is required to control gastrointestinal immunity in IL-10 knockout mice.

Author information

1
Immunology Research Laboratories, The Pathobioilogy and Nutrition Graduate Programs, Department of Veterinary Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

Abstract

The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear receptor expressed in a number of different cells of the immune system. This study was performed to determine the effect of VDR deficiency on immune function and inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in a model of inflammatory bowel disease, namely interleukin-10 (IL-10) knockout mice. IL-10 knockout mice were generated which either could or could not respond to vitamin D (double IL-10/VDR knockout; DKO). The distribution and function of lymphocytes in both the primary and secondary lymphoid organs were compared and determined as a function of the severity of intestinal inflammation. DKO mice had normal thymic development and peripheral T-cell numbers at 3 weeks of age, but a week after intestinal disease was detected the thymus was dysplastic with a reduction in cellularity. The atrophy was coupled with increased apoptosis. The spleen weight of DKO mice increased as a result of the accumulation of red blood cells; however, there was a 50% reduction in the numbers of T and B cells. Conversely, the mesenteric lymph nodes were enlarged and contained increased numbers of lymphocytes. The T cells from DKO mice were of a memory phenotype and were hyporesponsive to T-cell receptor stimulation. Colitis in the DKO mice was associated with local and high expression of IL-2, interferon-gamma, IL-1beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and IL-12. The primary and secondary lymphoid organs in DKO mice are profoundly altered as a consequence of the fulminating inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. VDR expression is required for the T cells and other immune cells to control inflammation in the IL-10 KO mice.

PMID:
16476050
PMCID:
PMC1782241
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2567.2005.02290.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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