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Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2006 Feb;129(2):195-204.

Long-term sequellae of oral appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea patients: Part 1. Cephalometric analysis.

Author information

1
Division of Orthodontics, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. falmeida@interchange.ubc.ca

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Oral appliances (OAs) have been widely used to treat snoring and sleep apnea, but their effects on craniofacial structures in patients after 5 years or more of wear have not yet been quantified.

METHODS:

Seventy-one patients who had worn adjustable mandibular repositioners to treat snoring or sleep apnea were evaluated. Upright lateral cephalometric radiographs in centric occlusion taken before treatment and after a mean of 7.3 +/- 2.1 years of OA use were compared. Baseline sleep studies and patient demographic data were included in the analysis.

RESULTS:

Cephalometric analyses after long term OA use showed significant (P < .01) changes in many variables, including increases in mandibular plane and ANB angles; decreases in overbite and overjet; retroclined maxillary incisors; proclined mandibular incisors; increased lower facial height; and distally tipped maxillary molars with mesially tipped and erupted mandibular molars. The initial deep overbite group had a significantly greater decrease in overbite. Duration of OA use correlated positively with variables such as decreased overbite and increased mandibular plane angle; changes in the dentition appeared to be progressive over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

After long-term use, OAs appear to cause changes in tooth positions that also might affect mandibular posture.

PMID:
16473711
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajodo.2005.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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