Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Hepatol. 2006 Jun;44(6):1046-54. Epub 2005 Dec 7.

In vivo hepatic HB-EGF gene transduction inhibits Fas-induced liver injury and induces liver regeneration in mice: a comparative study to HGF.

Author information

1
Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

It is unknown whether heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can be a therapeutic agent, although previous studies suggested that HB-EGF might be a hepatotrophic factor. This study explores the potential of hepatic HB-EGF gene therapy in comparison with HGF.

METHODS:

Mice received an intraperitoneal injection of the agonistic anti-Fas antibody 72 h after an intravenous injection of either adenoviral vector (1x10(11) particles) expressing human HB-EGF (Ad.HB-EGF), human HGF (Ad.HGF) or no gene (Ad.dE1.3), and were sacrificed 24 or 36 h later to assess liver injury and regeneration.

RESULTS:

Exogenous HB-EGF was predominantly localized on the membrane, suggesting the initial synthesis of proHB-EGF in hepatocytes. The control Ad.dE1.3-treated mice represented remarkable increases in serum ALT and AST levels and histopathologically severe liver injuries with numerous apoptosis, but a limited number of mitogenic hepatocytes. In contrast, the liver injuries and apoptotic changes were significantly inhibited, but the mitogenic hepatocytes remarkably increased, in both the Ad.HB-EGF- and Ad.HGF-treated mice. More mitogenic hepatocytes and milder injuries were observed in the Ad.HB-EGF-treated mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

HB-EGF has more potent protective and mitogenic effects for hepatocytes than HGF, at least for the present conditions. In vivo hepatic HB-EGF gene transduction is therapeutic for Fas-induced liver injury.

PMID:
16466829
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhep.2005.10.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center