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Curr Med Res Opin. 2006 Feb;22(2):405-15.

An overview of the prevalence of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D inadequacy amongst elderly patients with or without fragility fracture in the United Kingdom.

Author information

1
JB Medical Ltd, The Old Brickworks, Chapel Lane, Little Cornard, Sudbury, Suffolk, UK. tdixon@jbmedical.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many studies have investigated the prevalence of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D inadequacy throughout the world and found a high prevalence of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D inadequacy in older patients, particularly those with fragility fracture.

SCOPE:

To review the findings from vitamin D audits from six units across the UK and compare with previously published data from around the world. Results from four units have been previously published (Belfast, Glasgow, London and Medway) and this paper presents new data from Southampton and Carshalton, and further sub-analysis of the data from Medway.

FINDINGS:

Three audits of patients attending metabolic bone clinics (Carshalton, Medway and Southampton) identified 954 patients, of which overall 49% had a prior fragility fracture. Mean 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels ranged from 47.7 nmol/L to 62.4 nmol/L. Of these patients 72.9-88.9% had a 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level < 80 nmol/L, 68.8-83.3% < 70 nmol/L and 37.5-59.1% < 50 nmol/L. The mean age of patients ranged from 60.0 to 67.5 years. Sub-analysis of the data by fracture status revealed that patients with fracture had lower mean levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D compared with patients without fracture. This was statistically significant in the sub-analysis of the Medway data (45.3 nmol/L versus 49.9 nmol/L, p < 0.005). Three audits identified 330 patients with fragility fracture. Audits from Glasgow and Belfast specifically identified patients with fragility fracture. A subgroup of patients with fracture aged over 50 years from the Medway audit was also included in this group. Mean levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D ranged from 40.0 nmol/L to 52.3 nmol/L. 83.7-96.4% of patients had a 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level < 80 nmol/L, 73.3-89.7% < 70 nmol/L and 55.8-73.2% < 50 nmol/L. The mean age of patients ranged from 65.3 to 68.6 years. The audits carried out in Belfast and Medway were also divided by supplementation status. Mean 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels were 48.1 nmol/L in Belfast and 40.5 nmol/L in Medway in the patients not receiving supplements and 53.8 nmol/L and 59.9 nmol/L, respectively in the patients receiving supplements. The difference was statistically significant in the Medway audit (p < 0.0001), but not in the smaller Belfast audit (p = 0.216). As would be expected, the prevalence of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D inadequacy was higher in the patients not receiving supplements, for example at the 70 nmol/L threshold: 82.6% versus 67.1% in Belfast and 89.6% versus 72.7% in Medway. Three audits specifically identified 694 patients with hip fracture (Belfast, Glasgow and London). Mean levels of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D ranged from 24.7 nmol/L to 36.1 nmol/L. Of these patients 90.7-99.0% had a 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level < 80 nmol/L, 88.4-98.0% < 70 nmol/L and 81.6-92.7% < 50 nmol/L. The mean age of patients ranged from 73.4 to 80.5 years.

CONCLUSION:

Inadequate 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels are extremely common in the elderly and particularly so in patients with fragility fracture - specifically in those with hip fracture. Although the differing audit specifications and assay techniques used make direct comparisons difficult, the data do provide a snapshot of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D status across the UK and are consistent with those previously observed elsewhere in Europe and the rest of the world.

PMID:
16466613
DOI:
10.1185/030079906X89810
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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