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Mycopathologia. 2006 Feb;161(2):61-5.

Molecular analysis of malassezia microflora from patients with pityriasis versicolor.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, 1-30 Fujigaoka, Aoba-ku, 227-8501, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. tetolana@sunny.ocn.ne.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a superficial infection of the stratum corneum caused by Malassezia species. Eleven species have been identified within this genus, namely M. globosa, M. restricta, M. sympodialis, M. furfur, M. obtusa, M. slooffiae, M. pachydermatis, M. dermatis, M. japonica, M. yamatoensis, M. nana. M. furfur has long been identified as the causative fungus of PV. However, recent studies using the culture and isolation identified by morphological and physiological characteristics suggest that M. globosa is the causative agent of PV.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of PV microorganisms with a molecular-based non-culture method.

PATIENTS:

The subjects were 49 patients with PV (32 males, 17 females; 16-83 years old) who visited our outpatient clinic.

METHODS:

Samples were taken from lesions for direct microscopy with methylene blue and detected Malassezia species without M. pachydermatis and M. nana using a non-culture-based method consisting of nested PCR with specific primers.

RESULTS:

The most frequently isolated species were M. globosa and M. restricta (both 93.9%). Only M. globosa was detected from the lesion in which the mycelial form alone was observed microscopically, but M. restricta was not.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that M. globosa is the causative agent of PV.

PMID:
16463088
DOI:
10.1007/s11046-005-0149-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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