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Ophthalmology. 2006 Mar;113(3):431-6. Epub 2006 Feb 3.

Patient-reported behavior and problems in using glaucoma medications.

Author information

1
University of North Carolina School of Pharmacy, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7590, USA. Betsy_Sleath@unc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objectives of the current study were to describe the different types of problems patients receiving adjunctive therapy reported having when taking their glaucoma medications and to examine the relationship between patient-reported problems in taking their glaucoma medications and patient adherence.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey.

PARTICIPANTS:

A survey was distributed to glaucoma patients in 4 geographically distinct ophthalmology practices. We excluded patients using only 1 glaucoma medication. The survey was completed by 324 patients.

METHODS:

For each patient, average percent adherence to his or her glaucoma medication regimen was calculated. Logistic regression was used to examine how patient characteristics and problems in using glaucoma medications were related to reported adherence.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Whether patients were less than 100% adherent in the previous week.

RESULTS:

We found that 60% of patients reported 1 or more problems with taking their glaucoma medications. Fourteen percent of patients reported being less than 100% adherent to their glaucoma regimen medications during the previous week. Patients who had difficulty remembering to take their glaucoma medications and those who reported that they had other problems or concerns with their glaucoma medications were significantly less likely to be 100% adherent.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patient adherence to a glaucoma medication regimen could be improved among patients receiving adjunctive therapy. Ophthalmologists and their clinical colleagues should make sure to discuss the problems and concerns that patients may have in taking their glaucoma medications in an effort to improve adherence.

PMID:
16458967
DOI:
10.1016/j.ophtha.2005.10.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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