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Burns. 2006 Mar;32(2):246-50. Epub 2006 Jan 31.

Burns in pregnancy.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medical Sciences of Tabriz, Iran. maghsoudih@yahoo.com

Abstract

A 9-year prospective study of burns in pregnant women hospitalized at the Sina hospital burn center was conducted to determine the etiology and outcome of pregnant patients. Fifty-one patients (27.45% self-inflicted, 72.55% unintentional) were identified and stratified by age, burn size, presence or absence of inhalation injury, trimester of pregnancy, maternal and fetal mortality, and cause of burn. The mean patient age was 24.2 years. There were 20 maternal deaths and 23 fetal deaths. The majority of which (maternal: 13 and fetal: 13) were among self-inflicted burned pregnant women. The mean burn size was 37.7%, and was significantly larger for nonsurvivors of mother than survivors (68.8% versus 17.6%; p<0.001). In the 51 pregnant women, as the total burned body surface area exceeds 40%, both maternal and fetal mortality reaches 100%. Inhalation injuries were strongly associated with large burns, and were presents in all suicide patients. Kerosene ignition (68.6% of all patients, 100% of self-inflicted patients) was the most common type of burn. Large burn size was the strongest predictor of mortality of mother and fetus followed by the presence of inhalation injury.

PMID:
16448763
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2005.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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