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Transplantation. 2006 Jan 27;81(2):214-9.

Graft loss from recurrent glomerulonephritis is not increased with a rapid steroid discontinuation protocol.

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1
Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. ibrah007@umn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The risk of recurrence of glomerulonephritis in kidney transplant recipients on a steroid-free maintenance immunosuppression protocol is unknown.

METHODS:

We studied the 4-year graft and patient survival in 105 adult kidney transplant recipients who received their transplant for glomerulonephritis (GN) and were treated with a protocol incorporating rapid discontinuation of prednisone for 5 days (group 1). We compared these outcomes to two control groups; 439 concurrent recipients who received a transplant for causes other than GN (group 2) and to 260 kidney transplant recipients who received an allograft for GN between 1994 and 1999 and were maintained on a steroid-based immunosuppressive protocol (group 3).

RESULTS:

The 4-year graft and patient survival were similar in the three groups. Acute rejection-free survival was also similar. Serial annual serum creatinine and estimated GFR were also comparable amongst the three groups. Two grafts were lost in group 1 from biopsy-proven recurrent GN and eight other subjects had evidence of histological recurrence at 11.2+/-11.9 months. Seven grafts were lost for recurrent disease in group 3 and 15 others had evidence of histological recurrence at 29.1+/-32.6 months. The mean time to graft loss from recurrence was 52+/-22 months.

CONCLUSION:

A regimen that utilizes rapid discontinuation of steroids conveys no added risk of graft loss from recurrent GN in the short term but longer follow-up is needed. A consideration should be made to discontinue corticosteroids in the potential recipients who are on them at the time of transplantation.

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