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J Pediatr. 2006 Jan;148(1):16-22.

Longitudinal changes in insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and beta-cell function during puberty.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine longitudinal changes in insulin sensitivity (SI), insulin secretion, and beta-cell function during puberty in white and black youth.

STUDY DESIGN:

The tolbutamide-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test and minimal modeling were used to measure SI, the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), and beta-cell function (disposition index, DI) in white (n = 46) and black (n = 46) children (mean [+/-SD] age at baseline = 10.2 +/- 1.7 years). Growth curve models (including 272 observations) with SI, AIRg, and DI regressed on Tanner stage were run after adjusting for covariates.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for covariates, growth curve models revealed that SI decreased and subsequently recovered by the end of puberty in whites and blacks (both p < .05), AIRg decreased linearly across Tanner stages in both races (both p < .001), and DI decreased across puberty in blacks (p = .001) but not in whites (p = .2).

CONCLUSIONS:

White and black youth exhibited transient insulin resistance and diminished AIRg during puberty. The progressive decline in DI among blacks versus whites may reflect a unique effect of puberty on beta-cell compensation in blacks. Future studies are needed to identify whether this difference contributes to the increased risk of type II diabetes in young blacks.

PMID:
16423592
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2005.08.059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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