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J Thromb Haemost. 2006 Feb;4(2):403-10.

Murine model of ferric chloride-induced vena cava thrombosis: evidence for effect of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor.

Author information

1
Department of Thrombosis Biology, Bristol Myers Squibb Company, Pennington, NJ 08534, USA. xinkang.wang@bms.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE:

Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is a plasma carboxypeptidase that renders a fibrin-containing thrombus less sensitive to lysis. In the present study, we describe the development of a murine model of vena cava thrombosis and its use to characterize the antithrombotic activity of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) of TAFIa (activated TAFI) in mice.

METHODS/RESULTS:

Vena cava thrombosis was induced by various concentrations of FeCl(3) in C57BL/6 mice. A relatively mild stimulus (3.5% FeCl(3)) induced thrombosis that was consistent and sensitive to reference antithrombotic agents such as clopidogrel and heparin. Dose-response studies identified a PCI dose (5 mg kg(-1) bolus plus 5 mg kg(-1) h(-1), i.v.) that produced a maximum 45% decrease in vena cava thrombus mass as assessed by protein content (n = 8, P < 0.01 compared to vehicle) in the 3.5% FeCl(3)-induced model without exogenous tissue plasminogen activator administration. In contrast, PCI had no effect on 3.5% FeCl(3)-induced carotid artery thrombosis in mice. In a tail transection bleeding model, the 5 mg kg(-1) bolus plus 5 mg kg(-1) h(-1) dose of PCI increased tail-bleeding time up to 3.5 times control (n = 8, P < 0.05). The ex vivo activity of antithrombotic doses of PCI was also demonstrated by the enhanced lysis of whole blood clots formed in a thrombelastograph with the addition of a sub-threshold concentration of tPA.

CONCLUSION:

These studies provide evidence for a role of TAFIa in venous thrombosis in mice, and describe an optimized vena cava injury model appropriate for the evaluation of antithrombotic drugs and the characterization of novel therapeutic targets.

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