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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Jan 24;103(4):1065-70. Epub 2006 Jan 13.

Dissociation of face-selective cortical responses by attention.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Brain and Cognition and Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. mfurey@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

We studied attentional modulation of cortical processing of faces and houses with functional MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG detected an early, transient face-selective response. Directing attention to houses in "double-exposure" pictures of superimposed faces and houses strongly suppressed the characteristic, face-selective functional MRI response in the fusiform gyrus. By contrast, attention had no effect on the M170, the early, face-selective response detected with MEG. Late (>190 ms) category-related MEG responses elicited by faces and houses, however, were strongly modulated by attention. These results indicate that hemodynamic and electrophysiological measures of face-selective cortical processing complement each other. The hemodynamic signals reflect primarily late responses that can be modulated by feedback connections. By contrast, the early, face-specific M170 that was not modulated by attention likely reflects a rapid, feed-forward phase of face-selective processing.

PMID:
16415158
PMCID:
PMC1348001
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0510124103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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